Published On: Fri, Nov 21st, 2014
Food | By Dion

Informative Japanese Table Manners

eat-clean-when-eating-out

photo: face-of-fit.com

It would be handy to know Japanese table manners so you won’t be considered rude or impolite. After all, Japan is known for its very thick and visible traditional culture, so it doesn’t hurt to know some of the manners, especially when eating. Whether you eat at home or go to restaurants, know the basic customs and manners.

 

The Basic Facts

In order to learn about Japanese table manners, you should realize that the arrangement is different from the one in Western cultures. In traditional Japanese custom, there will be tatami floor with low table and also big cushions so you can sit on the floor – well, not on the floor as you will be seating on the cushion.

 

Itadakimasu!

Itadakimasu!

photo: fc03.deviantart.net

The General Facts

When you want to follow Japanese table manners, here are the things to do:

  • Say itadakimasu – I gracefully receive – before you start eating. When you are completely done, say gochisosama deshita – thank you for the meal.
  • It is quite common to share dishes as well as dealing with individual dish. Make sure that you use the already provided serving chopsticks when you move the food to your plate. If such chopsticks aren’t available, make sure to use the opposite end.
  • It is better to learn using chopsticks as most restaurants don’t provide regular spoon and fork.

 

Some of the Table Manners and Rules

If you don’t want to make mistakes, be sure to follow detailed attention to these things:

  • Never blow your nose in public because it is considered bad manners. Doing it in the eating table is a big no-no
  • If you are able to empty the dishes with no rice being left, it is considered very polite and good.
  • It is not allowed to talk about anything gross related to toilet or other unsanitary issues is a big no-no, especially during eating time
  • Burping is considered impolite too
  • It would be great if you can return the position of the dishes after eating to the original position as it is considered proper and polite. Such action covers putting the chopsticks back into the paper slip or into the box, and returning the lids of the dishes.

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photo: i.telegraph.co.uk

Rules for Drinking

There are also rules for drinking, especially the alcoholic ones. it is customary to serve others first instead of pouring your own drink. You should check the others’ cups and refill them if they are empty. If you see other people trying to serve you, make sure to empty your cup right away and hold your cup toward him/her. Try not to get drunk in public as getting drunk is considered rude and bad in Japan. If you get drunk in high end or formal restaurants – especially those serving the haute cuisine (kaiseki ryori) – you will be considered impolite. Make sure that you don’t bother others and your behavior is still tolerable. It is also a good idea to start drinking together, so never start drinking before the others are ready. In Japanese table manners, wait for the drinking salute to be made and bottom’s up!

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- the man who love japan , culture, people ^_^

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